OOPS, making mistakes helps (also the others)

OOPS, making mistakes helps (also the others) 17 October 2017

How can you avoid OOPS moments that might create friction between Customers and sales assistants? By creating a trusted environment for your sales team to formulate the "ok solution", says Tristan Rigendinger, Senior Partner International Projects Logotel

OOPS, making mistakes helps (also the others)

Humans decode hundreds of messages every day, whether through verbal communication with colleagues, salespeople, customers or family members or through nonverbal messages, as with design, lighting, temperature and the weather. We categorise these messages into the proper context based on the emotion they evoke.

While the messages usually fit normal parameters, occasionally a message feels awkward and uncomfortable, resulting in an OOPS moment that hinders the connection. Customers, for example, may experience OOPS moments when talking with salespeople; perhaps the salesperson is being too pushy or showing no interest whatsoever in the customer. Equally, an unappealing product presentation or business infrastructure and an inadequate customer-experience strategy can also cause OOPS moments.
In a dramatically changing retail world, generating and then capitalising on positive word of mouth is critical to maintaining a good reputation and attracting new Customers.

OOPS moments can quickly undermine a positive reputation – witness the swift impact of negative comments on social media. However, learning to recognise and then correct or eliminate OOPS moments from your business activities offers a significant competitive advantage. Let’s be honest: not all customer-facing staff realise that their behaviour sometimes causes OOPS moments. And it is exactly at these critical moments that a customer may find an interaction strange, awkward or wrong, thus stalling their purchasing decision. However, coaching customer-facing staff to recognise behaviour that leads to OOPS moments may offer the most effective method of avoiding them.
Eliminating OOPS moments:

 

Achieving this can be challenging! We support an informal workshop-style approach where the whole team share best practices, ensuring that every opinion in the group counts and each input is valued.

The team’s knowledge is recognised as a valid product of first-hand professional experience. For a successful workshop session, you need an experienced facilitator with the expertise to establish an atmosphere of trust and draw participants effectively into the conversation, so that they willingly share their personal OOPS moments and learn from one another. Such sessions often produce useful insights. Above all, participants see that their comments and experience contribute to developing the solution.
Ultimately, the team grows stronger and much more sensitive to OOPS moments.

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